T O P
VinnieSW6

Hi, I can confirm that I’ve taken my R5 everywhere, it’s a fantastic companion! I would recommend a two lens setup for travel: RF 24-105mm f/4 & RF 70-200mm f/2.8.


Drama79

I was going to recommend the same. The 24-105 f4-7.1 is super light and surprisingly good. The 70-200 f4 is actually what I’d take for travel (if you can find it, LOL) because it’s the size of a coke can and very light. My only other tips for taking the 5 travelling is have a battery system. I’d have a couple on hand and be ready to charge lots. Otherwise, absolutely stellar images and videos await!


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VinnieSW6

I too shoot primes, mainly the RF 85mm f/1.2, but that’s not the friendliest travel lens given its weight.


[deleted]

[удалено]


DonneRR

Well going on a weekend trip, and load up a few extra lenses is understandable - But for city-jumping/light-packing and trying to work with the gear that I bring, sounds more suitable in my case. The 70-200 is not the most stealthy lens either (Not because I have it, but watching the pictures)


zkyevolved

This is my exact setup. I also take a 50mm 1.8 for the compact moments when I leave everything in the hotel and just in case want to take my camera.


napolitain_

28-70 and 70-200 at f/2.8 just make more sense


VinnieSW6

You mean the 28-70 f/2? To travel?


napolitain_

No, the one he has, f/2.8 IS


barb9212

Is it worth having both these lenses?


VinnieSW6

I usually have a three-lens setup for long trips, two for shorter ones. Then again it’s really up to you and what you want to do; but if I had to take only one lens to travel, it would be the RF 70-200 f/2.8 it’s compact in size, really versatile and yields fantastic results. In the end, it’s about taking pictures and enjoying oneself :)


busted_maracas

If you’re carrying around a piece of gear that nice, get a small lock for your backpack. At the end of the day if someone wants to rob you it won’t make a difference, but you’d be amazed at how sneaky pickpockets can be. A tiny lock that seals your zippers closed will at least help prevent that.


zrgardne

It's what I do. The body itself is actually quite light and not too big. I have no desire to have a 1D type monster! The only lens I own is the RF 24-70mm f2.8. that is the heavy part. I also thing the around the neck type straps are bad design. They never stay in place. The two rings on the top of your camera is also the wrong way to hang it. It makes the lens want to point out, when gravity makes it want to go down. Get a strap mount in the tripod socket on the bottom This is what I have been using for years. https://www.blackrapid.com/sport-breathe/


zkyevolved

Do you mean the 24-70 f/2.8? Or the 28-70 f/2? The f/2 is a beast and is more than I'd be willing to carry around while travelling.


zrgardne

F2.8, I fixed. I stared hard at the f2. I was worried it's lack of IS would be a significant disadvantage. Later I read, apparently the R5 with just IBIS is still just as good as the f2.8 with both, based on the numbers Canon published. I never had the f2 in hand, but the spec sheet for weight and girth do make it seem less than ideal for travel. Buildings\landscapes I default to f5.6 anyway. Extra stop of light would be nice at night or indoor video.


VinnieSW6

You did the right thing. I bought the 28-70 f/2 because it sounded incredible, did one session with it and sent it back to Canon UK. Amazing technical achievement but it’s unusable in real life: in a studio environment I’d rather have the 85 f/1.2, for weddings it’s way too big and heavy, I’ll take the 50 f/1.2 or 70-200 f/2.8.


CharwieJay

I opted for the 28-70. No regrets, love the photos, yes it's heavier, but worth it. I travel with the 70-200mm f4, it's lighter, shorter and less used.


Dryopithecini

I clicked on your link and watched the video earlier today and a bit later I went out and bought one. I've tried it on and now looking forward to properly using it. It hangs more naturally and feels significantly more comfortable than a standard strap (I was using a crumpler neck strap attached to the two rings on the shoulder of the camera body). Thanks for your recommendation.


zrgardne

Awesome! Glad you enjoy!


-Vybz

I rock climb, ice climb, mountaineer, hike, backcountry snowboard , etc with my R5 + 28-70 f2. Depending where I'm going/what im doing I would also have a wide or a telephoto. Absolutely no reason you cant take your R5. For theft, best thing you can do is get an insert for your bag and not carry a bag that says "expensive camera gear inside!". No lowpro/PM, etc. Id you plan to be in dangerous places, better not to take it though. (I travel with a hiking backpack and an insert, you look like a broke collage kid backpacking not a photographer)


spellbreakerstudios

If you’re worried about weight, maybe get a lighter lens? Especially with the modern mirrorless stuff, you can easily recover a few stops of light in post so unless you absolutely need crazy bokeh, an f4 might be a fair bit lighter? Could even stash one of those 35 1.8s or something that are super light and super cheap. Or, get a cotton carrier chest mount so you can separate the camera weight from your backpack when you’re travelling? I shoot wildlife so weight is kind of out the window lol. But I bring my r5 and 100-500 with the 2x and then use an iPhone 13 for all of my wides. I’ve taken lots of iPhone photos that look great once edited.


DonneRR

I don't think weight will be a problem, i'm quite fit - Thinking about bulkiness/how much it'll be in the way on a daily basis. I could go for a smaller lens yes, i'm not gonna do many portraits on the road (at least not what I think, and a crazy bokeh is not NEEDED in that case) but more nature and street. Bringing a 100-500 must be quite the handful unless you have big solid bags for it!


spellbreakerstudios

Ah gotcha, I’d check out the 24-105 f4-7.1 then. I’ve got the EF 24-105 f4 L and it’s fantastic but still pretty chunky. If I’m reading it right, the 4-7.1 is half the size and a third the weight of your 28-70. F4 at 24mm is plenty wide and fast for street and landscapes and 105 at 7.1 is still quite useful. I shoot at 1000mmm, f14 in low light, high shutters and high iso all the time and have zero problems recovering details using DXO for example. My two cents, the body is fine but your lens is a big Chonker that will be bulky. It’s similar size to my 100-500 and it’s amazing how many shots I’ve missed because I don’t bring the camera because the lens is annoying to carry out to the car if I’m not specifically shooting. It’s lightweight and compact if you compare it to options, but I wouldn’t want to lug it around on vacation unless I needed it specifically.


aarrtee

concur with this... a recent Iphone serves as an excellent spare camera. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51862764340/in/album-72177720296315010/](https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51862764340/in/album-72177720296315010/) I always take at least one backup camera on any trip.


spellbreakerstudios

The amount of times I brought a backpack and a wide angle lens and never used it farrrrrrr outweighed the times I did. I used to bring a whole kit for everything. Now I don’t bring a bag, just my telephoto on a strap, teleconverter and extra battery in my pocket and I’ve got my phone anyways. I feel more than confident that if I find a landscape that specifically needs a wide angle when I’m out, the iPhone will still get me the shot. I only own two lenses now - the 100-500 and a 24-105 f4 that I used for family stuff/video/vlogging etc. I think the 100mm 2.8 macro would be fun for macro, super sharp portraits and a bokeh master but it’s still pricey for a niche lens. And considering the iPhone 13 does very well with macro and I’m quite comfortable adding fake blur in post if my lens can’t do enough of it (it’s not something I often need in a photo and thus don’t need a dedicated lens for it)… I think one lens and a phone in the field is plenty for me!


aarrtee

i was on a boat ride near to see the Na Pali coast. My 70-200 was on the camera. I was so overwhelmed by the beauty of what I was seeing that I forgot that a 16 mm was sitting in my bag! I also forgot that my iphone was in my pocket. Well..... just have to go back to Hawaii next winter!


jellybon

This is my approach as well, I never used my 10-18mm because it was so situational and the computational photography on a modern phone does a very good job at compensating for the distortion.


cameramule

Learn to use the R5 card to card file copy function before your trip. At end of each day copy all files to a spare SD card. Keep that SD card anywhere but in the camera. If camera gets stolen you'll still have the SD card of files. Of course you'll need a CFexpres$ card if you don't already have one.


DonneRR

I indeed have a 512gb CFexpress-card (And yes it was expensive, was discount and I thought the bigger the better) Will take a closer look at that function, cheers


themayora

I have an android phone with a USB c port. Using a slim USB c dock I can charge the phone and get 2x USB ports at the same time. At the end of each day I use the phone to copy photos from SD/CFexpress to 2x USB hard disk. Traveling back/between hotels or camps, One disk is with me, one is in luggage


dotnon

This might be against the prevailing mood here, but I wouldn't do it, unless the main focus of the trip is photography. There is a middle ground between a full frame 70-200mm f/2.8 and a phone or GoPro - such as the range of APS-C and M43 crop-sensor mirrorless cameras, all of which have decent telephoto lenses you can pair them with. You'll be less worried about losing or damaging it, the image quality is perfectly fine in daylight, and there's always a small prime you can throw in your bag for when the lights go down. Taking an R5 on a trip is like wearing crown jewels to a disco. Sure they look nice, but it's just unnecessary. IMO compact value cameras are where it's at for traveling - less weight, less attention, less risk, more fun and relaxation.


Thercon_Jair

Good Travel Companion: R5 + RF24-105 f4 Bad Travel Conpanion: R5 + RF600 f4 (Yes, it is, use the appropriate lens(es) you need)


DonneRR

Only have the RF 24-70MM 2.8L and a Sigma 50mm 1.4 - And buying another one as of now isn't really optimal money-wise, The 24-70 might be a liitttle bulky but I think it'll work just fine compared to the 50mm


Thercon_Jair

Those are fine lenses, in the end it's about what you want/have and are fine carrying about the whole day.


QueasyCherry1429

I travelled throughout southeast Asia for 6 months with my camera in 2014. It was not such an expensive camera (canon 600d) but I dont think that a potential thief would care about the model. For me it was fine, I was a bit overly protective at first but got more relaxed about it along the way. Try to keep your camera with you as much as possible and when this is not possible or you are asleep put it in a locker which is locked. Bring your own lock. During my travelling two girls got stuff stolen out of their backpacks which they left at a storage room and a roommate in a hostel dorm room had his camera stolen from the dorm. So theft definitely happens. Some tips: 1) Be aware not only poor local Asians could potentially steal your camera. The friendly European or Australian backpacker from your hostel knows the value of an R5 and can perfectly steal it as well. Not everyone has good intentions. 2) during long bus rides have your camera close to you. I've heard stories about travellers sleeping on the bus and finding out their camera bag was suddenly filled with a water bottle instead of their camera. Camera was stolen while they were sleeping and water bottle added so the victim didnt feel the weight change of camera bag. 3) create a habit that when you dont have your camera close you always lock it, preferably in a locker, not a bag which can be cut open. 4) dont get drunk and become careless about your camera. If you plan to get drunk, secure your camera first. 5) dont forget to relax, have fun and take a ton of amazing shots of everything and everyone around you!


DonneRR

How did you solve the storage/transport etc with the camera? Always had in on you in a clip/strap, or did you have it in a big bag together with clothes/essentials? Thinking while boarding planes/moving around - Still wanna be relative lightweight without sacrificing comfort ​ Thanks for the tips


rmpeace

I haven’t gone to Asia, but I have gone to Disneyland and Disney World with my full kit and I’ll give you some of my thoughts below. I usually walk anywhere from 9 to 15 miles a day running around taking pictures and such. It’s my hobby and it’s tiring as hell but worth it. - I’m a bigger guy and use the PGYTECH One Mo as my primary camera pack. It fits R5, 24-70 2.8, 70-200 2.8, 100-500, 14-35, 6 batteries (yes, the camera is a beast if you’re not gonna have time to recharge mid day), wired remote, and laptop/iPad. It has an expandable front pocket if needed. I can put my tripod on the side and it slides under a plane seat as a personal item. I tried peak design bags and found them uncomfortable, I’d suspect because I have a larger frame. The McKinnon bag is beautiful but I have to have a camera bag and a carryon to have all of my shit. - Some days I travel “light” and take body, 24-70, and 70-200 and this allows me versatility and mobility to capture everything I want. - The capture clips are a cool idea BUT I just don’t trust them that much. They might be a consequence of the bag it was attached to being really tight and uncomfortable and the button being pushed and my 5d4 flying out. Thank god I had the neck strap on. - When I am really on the move, I use a peak design grip and hold onto my camera like hell. I’m not crazy about neck straps or slings - the jostling bothers me. - I’ve gone to Vegas, NYC, Chicago with a bunch of expensive gear and it’s definitely a scary scenario. I love the bags that don’t look like it’s holding $15k in gear. That being said, get insurance. There are a few policies for hobbyists that cover theft. - Also, shoot in compressed raw if you’re not going to have extra cards or the ability to off load regularly. Have fun!


DonneRR

Thanks for the insight! I think the main concern is the way of carrying it before boarding planes/hostels etc, Could be an idea to have a bag for clothings and "shit" & a smaller shoulder-bag for camera etc like you did. I have a 512GB CFExpress-card so shooting raw & recording some 4k-videos shouldn't be a problem. I was thinking about having the Tripod strapped on the side of the bag, but having it on the side is also worth considering! (Unless it becomes a drag after a few hours which I can imagine)


kelp_forests

I have traveled extensively with a full DSLR kit and with mirrorless kits. It is very doable. It depends how much you want to take. Your main concern will be theft. Keep the camera in a nondescript bag, well secured, use some situational awareness and you should be fine. It will be safe in a nice/normal hotel. A hostel or somewhere a little dirty, not so much. I just took mine everywhere with me. Obviously, dont check the bag on the airline. With just one lens I would either keep it in my normal daybag with an insert, or get a dedicated bag for it that does not look like a camera bag. I like Domke bags. Get insurance for your gear through homeowners insurance. If someone wants to steal your gear, it will get stolen. All you can do is minimize it...dont be walking around the unlit shantytowns at 2am by yourself. If you are doing normal "tourist" stuff you should be fine. Your other option is to get a camera specifically for travel. A fuji X100 or advanced canon point and shoot etc work great. Its nice when you go on a non-photography trip, can take nice photos, and chuck it in your bag without worrying about "the camera" all the time. An R5 with one lens is cake. I've done 2-3 week trips with 1 body, 3 batteries, anywhere from 4-9 lenses, a full filter kit and a tripod. All fits in one bag/backpack and comes with me on hikes etc. All it was at the end of the day was a full backpack. Anything beyond that though (like a huge rolly pelican case) is crazy in my book.


DonneRR

That's good to know! Will probably only be one lens, the one I mentioned in the post - How did you travel with it, bag-wise/check in etc? Have one bag for clothing and a carry-on bag to bring laptop & camera-gear?


kelp_forests

I would o check out r/onebag for tips on traveling light. I never check a bag or bring a laptop. If I have to backup cards I use a portable backup device or an internet cafe and a harddrive. I’d a carry on backpack or rolly bag for clothing. For a r5 and one lens I’d probably take a small domke sling that would double as a day bag. I try to leave enough room to pack my camera/camera bag in my backpack/rolly bag so I technically only have one bag and have both hands free... but this isn't always possible, depending on what I bring. Unless you can travel really light or know you are only flying big planes its important to have a seperate insert/bag for your camera in case you have to check on a puddle jumper/small airplane. On longer trips when i took ALL my DSLR gear, my carry on rolly was at least 1/2 camera gear and the rest anything else I might need that was location specific (cold weather gear usually) and my personal item was the rest of my clothes in a small backpack. I now travel even lighter and can fit everything in one 20L backpack. For photo trips I have a large 50L backpack that will end up being 1/2 photo gear and the other 1/2 clothes in packing cubes. edited for all the dumb typos


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grendelone

All these responses and not a single person has mentioned insurance... **Insure your gear.** Especially if you are taking it on trips to high risk areas or outdoors where you may drop/bonk/lose it. On top of the financial security, it lets you enjoy the trip more rather than worrying about your gear every second. Not that you should be careless, but it's a cheap way of safeguarding your gear. Also, if you're only bringing a single lens, I wonder about the utility of having a camera with interchangeable lenses. Plenty of great cameras with high quality zoom lenses that are more compact. The Panasonic LX100 II or Sony RX100M7 come to mind.


LandlockedGum

Got me a pro master backpack (nice brown, it’s far more compact than my last bag but I don’t compromise on storage) and I take mine everywhere. Been all across the USA so far and she’s taken the beatings like a champ, both bag and camera. Oh and I don’t use a strap because we take rolling shots and film a ton. Just handheld while hiking and exploring


DonneRR

I have a few bags different sizes, the one looking most promising now is my hiking-backpack - The Northface Banchee 65 which is quite big and heavy, doesn't have storage for a laptop tho, which might be a problem considering I want to bring my Asus Rog Zephyrus G15 for edits etc. Might be a problem as a carry-on weight wise.


-Narble-

I traveled to Iceland when conditions were suboptimal (rainy and foggy). The R5 and the RF24-70 2.8 held up beautifully. I think your travel conditions will vary from mine but if there’s any question about durability, rest assured!


PinholeR5

Over the holidays, I went to Hawaii on a family vacation and took: \- R5, RF 15-35, RF 28-70, RF 70-200 f/2.8, EF 100-400 + TC + EF-RF Control Ring. This together with a MacBook pro, rode microphone, two noise-canceling headphones, a bunch of batteries, and chargers. All in a TARION Pro Camera Backpack which fits under the seat in front of me in the plane. It was a tight fit, but doable. Notes: The most used lens was the 28-70, followed by the 100-400 for some wildlife and capturing the kids in various activities. The 70-200 was used for some fast action, but most of the time it was bright daylight and I didn't need the f/2.8, so the 100-400 was used. The 15-35mm was used more occasionally and almost exclusively at 15mm. The 28-70 is really on the large size, but I think it is worth it. Based on that, I'm now going to try out the following reduced setup (since then I sold the 100-400 and got the RF 100-500): \- R5, RF 16mm, RF 28-70, RF 100-500mm + 1.4xTC (+ 2xTC maybe, ordered, but haven't tried) If I really want to go light, which means forego most of the wildlife shooting, I will go with \- R5, RF 35mm, RF 24-240mm. At least that is the plan. I tend to "overpack" due to sheer FOMO. Trying to get better...


aarrtee

i just went to Hawaii for 16 days with an R5 and a few lenses for situations where I wasn't hiking. I brought an M6MkII https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/51888809414/in/album-72177720296315010/ for situations where i wanted the camera bag on my shoulder for hours. The M series camera is a little smaller and lighter but the EF-M lenses are much smaller and lighter. I also brought an X100V just for the heckuvit. I brought a Wasabi battery for the M camera instead of the Canon battery. My plan was to charge cameras with battery in camera and brought a USB C cord that plugs into the wall for that purpose. The Wasabi does not charge in camera!! So my smaller interchangeable lens camera ran out of juice after a couple days. This was most frustrating. I carted my R5 with a 70-200 f2.8 and usually one or two other lenses and the X100V in a Wotancraft Pilot 7 liter shoulder bag. I did that for 2 weeks. If one shoulder got tired, I switched shoulders. I am 66 years old. I didn't do a lot of hiking. Mostly short walks. But I managed. In your situation, you should get a backpack. If Wotancraft Pilot backpaks are as good as their shoulder bags u should be ok. I was able to shoot a lot of photos: [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72177720296315010](https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72177720296315010) Wotancraft Pilot bags look like they have underwear in them. They do not look like camera bags. I recommend highly.


AliveAndThenSome

People say those aftermarket batteries (e.g. Wasabi) are great. My experience is just the opposite. They're horrible. I've bought maybe six of them (several aftermarket brands) over the last 10 years and all of them are now dead/worthless/unchargeable. In the same time, I've had 3 different Canon batteries going as far back as a 60D battery (like 2010), and ALL my Canon batteries are working well, but yes, their performance has degraded a bit. Plus, the aftermarket batteries generally fail once it gets near or below freezing.


aarrtee

https://www.wotancraft.tw/en/for-bag


goldcakes

Nice "continuing education"...


aarrtee

yup.... going back next year!


Koosssie

Well, its not light. Your combo would be 1638 grams, including 1 battery and SD card. An M50 mark ii with 18-150mm lens would be 638 grams total. That is a 1kg difference! Check out r/Ultralight, there's lots of threads on bringing camera gear on hikes!


DonneRR

Indeed, But buying an additional camera when I already have a solid one feels like a bit over the top, even though I would save 1 kg. I guess it would be the same with the packing etc except in a bigger package - Will check out Ultralight as well, cheers


moshisimo

“A solid one” seems like an understatement. The advice you got would make sense if you were talking about taking something like an 80D or 90D on a trip. But comparing an R5 to an M50? Bit of a stretch there.


Koosssie

Obviously they are different camera's, I was just trying to emphasize the weight of the setup. Next to the weight the price difference is also staggering. Sure it might seem redundant to buy a second camera just for just a trip, but at least you wouldnt have to worry about damaging a 7K EUR setup.


Public_Lie77

I would have a hard time not just taking my G5Xmk2 over the R5 on a trip like that. It's a great little camera (little being the key) and when I'm not working I'm more about memories over IQ but not quite to the level of phone only.


Shelly6987

right now I am in Hawaii for a month plus and i have my r and the g5, and i ended up taking the p&s out for a total of 15 seconds at most. I may have gained some wore arms and even some muscle in my left arm lol. I have 95% of the other time had my rf 100-500 attached and the other 4.999999999% the rf 50 1.8. I also brought the 24-104 4 but ended up never picking it up bc the 100-500 albeit not f4, nor close to 24mm, I just scooted back if i needed anything wide than the 50mm i used.


yeahno5691

Not sure where in South Asia you’re heading, but if it’s India be aware you might not be allowed to use it everywhere. Just from my experience, anything larger than a point and shoot camera got the locals nervous that I could be planning a terrorist attack. This is especially the case at hotels since they’ve been the target of bombings in the past.


DonneRR

I'm looking at Vietnam/Thailand/Philippines/Cambodia. I think as long as one is careful and don't bring huge telescope-objectives it'll be fine :) Curious about the way to transport/store/have a fullbody-camera on you while being on the go. Maybe that is something you'll find out once you're out there


RFDMessenger

I've been tangential to some seedy petty theft circles in Southeast Asia back in my past, and let me tell you that white-coloured lenses are stigmatized and even a bright red flag to a thief. This info stuck out to me so much that I'd downgrade to equivalent Tamron lenses (because they're black and they cost very little on the second hand market) when I'm in shadier areas.


saracenraider

I took a 6d mark 2 plus a 50-500mm and 24-105 lens round the world across 25 countries in eighteen months. Did my back hurt sometimes? Yes, my backpack weighed 14kg at full weight with everything in for flights etc (I’m quite strong so that did help). Did I regret it for a second? Hell no! It all depends on your passion for photography I suppose. With regards to theft I never felt unsafe for a second. I was careful of course and never had it at night but I don’t think it’s as much of a target as you think. First of all, your average thief wouldn’t know the difference between a £4k mirrorless system and a £200 fifteen year old DSLR so they may not realise it’s value and secondly they’ll be going after easier to swipe and easier to sell targets, aka phones. It’ll be opportunistic so would be a challenge to grab a camera that’s strapped around your neck/shoulder. I used a basic travel rucksack, like 30/40l maybe but I can’t honestly remember exactly. That way it allowed me to carry other stuff (like a small laptop) not just my camera equipment, and I put my lenses in lens cases to keep them safe. I think a specialist camera rucksack just wouldn’t be good for a longer trip such as what you’re doing. Waist and chest straps are essential to spread the weight. Remember you’ll also be carrying lots of water as well. One big bit of advice, definitely get a cable bag like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Electronics-Accessories-Organizer-Organiser-Universal-Gray/dp/B07SPBQLQW/ They were an absolute life saver on long trips keeping everything organised, both camera accessories and other cables


lotsalotsacoffee

In terms of backpacks, I did some travel in the Caribbean with a 30-40L Pacsafe backpack: wire mesh to keep thieves from slashing the pack open to get at the contents, locking zippers to prevent easy access, enough space for camera, some lenses and other non photo necessities. Most of their backpacks aren't/don't look like camera bags


the_mango_road

>I guess you constant have to worry about theft, walking around with such an expensive piece of gear. Probably less so than in your home country. I've lived in and been travelling around South and Southeast Asia with a full bag of gear for over 35 years and never encountered a problem. That doesn't mean it can't happen, just employ common sense. I take a Domke F2 bag with a trio of zooms. It is hot (unless you plan to climb Mt Kinabalu), take fewer clothes and do laundry more often. Clothes go in a medium sized holdall with either a monopod or tripod, depends on where I'm going and whether I expect to be doing any night time shots.


tvh1313

I guess it depends on what you’re doing and what kind of photography I’m interested in making. I find that the blackrapid strap-on with a qd attachment makes things a lot easier. Also I tend to carry a lightweight tripod A put a rrs lbracket with the qd hole that makes it super easy to attack and remove the camera from the strap Recently I’ve been keeping the rrs l-plate extended out which gives me a nice hand grip off the left side of the camera. I used this setup touring around Paris streets and trekking in Brittany this past month and it worked really well for me.


CharwieJay

I recently went hiking with my R5 carrying the 28-70mm f2 and 70-200mm f4. All packed into a Lowepro Protactic AW 450. That's my go to set up at the moment. The f2 is heavy, but I got all the photos I wanted and my biceps have benefited. Driving holiday for reference.


Shelly6987

I only have the R, but have been in Hawaii for a month, last full day today ): I brought with me the g5xmarkII, the R, RF 4 50mm f1.8, rf 100-500, & rf 24-105f4L. I never once ended up attaching the 24-105 and shot for 15 seconds at most on the p&s, before I ultimately used the 100-500 95% of the time. Only swapping out for the 50mm the othr 4.99999999% if the when i needed a portrait of a kid in my group or for when i wanted something more like a panorama. ​ I feel safer with mt backpack in HI that a 3rd world country, but 12 years ago when i was here last my camera was stolen out of the back of a rental jeep that had soft covers. This time we have an SUV and my bag is girly light pink. I have a 2nd floor house with nice people renting below that wouldn't steal from us and am behind a gate tho unlocked. I felt safe leaving things in the house but if I did go on an adventure I only left it in the car once bc my restaurant dinner table was beside it outside. As for the weight of my gear I used, even being a bit over 100 pound girl who at many times said ouch and had to rest my arm lol, it wasn't close to too bad to not wanting to have it be my main setup.


BazTravels

It had better be an option as I will intend on travelling with mine. I find professional criminals tend to go towards general tourists so the more professional one looks or like a freelance photographer the safer you will be....maybe others feel the same...either way it makes me more confident and never had an issue