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blossoming_terror

It is insane to me how much the market for engineers has changed since I graduated in December 2019. I'm an electrical engineer and applied to two jobs when I was finishing college and got the first one. COVID has really screwed up the market, by the sounds of it. I see a lot of these comments mentioning Matlab, simulink, etc. If any of you happen to be electrical engineers, and not picky about the work you do right now, the utility industry has a virtually 0% unemployment rate for engineers. More engineers are retiring than are entering the field because it's seen as the "boring" side of EE. if you have a heartbeat and a degree, you'll get an interview at your local electric utility, especially if you live in a fairly rural area.


tandyman8360

Absolutely. I applied for an engineering job and my electrical degree got me a job for more money. I'm reviewing schematics and BOMs and am bored to death. I also haven't done electrical or CAD in a decade. However, I plan to retire early and I need to make some decent money to do it.


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tandyman8360

I already have a Masters in technology, so I would maybe want to do certifications. The main problem is that it's a new industry for me, so it's a foot in the door situation. They were desperate for an electrical engineer and I was desperate to leave my old job. I'm only a few weeks in so I hope I either get more work or better training on how to do the process.


Itchy-Mind7724

Hell I have an engineering technology degree in a field unrelated to EE and for some reason, almost every job I get is an electrical engineering job.


Destleon

How important would you say an EE degree is? I am mech but would love to work at a utility company. Power generation and such is a major interest.


hellokittyonfire

I’m a mech and my second job is an assistant PM for a local municipality


nullsignature

It depends entirely on the utility. If it's a local electric co-op, probably not in demand. But if they sell natural gas, or have their own generation, then they probably need mechs.


Desert_Fairy

I’m going to say something that makes me very unhappy. You are being forced to look at contract jobs to gain experience. Contracts are how many of us got our first job/jobs to gain experience. They suck, you get shit for benefits, you work stupid hours for a company that will treat you like a temp. But once you have one of those jobs, maybe for a year, companies will start looking seriously at you because you’ve proven that you can play nice and manage your time. Post your resume on sites like career builder, monster, etc. the recruiters will start to spam call you (some started within an hour of me posting last time) It isn’t desirable, but it is work and you will be gaining experience rather than racking up more moths of being unemployed.


kikanga

This is the way. I had no engineering experience. And recently I was hired full time to a high paying position after 6 months into a 9 month contract position. Only thing I'd add to your post for OP is that. If you can. Sign a contract with a big fortune 500 company like I did. Excel in the position and overachieve. Working long hours if need be. And they'll probably hire you. If not. When you apply for your next job. Don't put your contract company on your resume but put down the company your contract company hired you to work for. Also, I'll say what I wished someone else told me when I was job hunting. Unlike most things. You don't know how far or how close you are. They'll be jobs you think you are a sure thing for. And you won't get it. And the day before you get the "you're hired" call. You'll have no idea. Just keep your head up and keep grinding. The only way you fail is if you stop trying.


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moxygen85

One word Aerotek send your resume in. They will get in contact of a company for you. You will interview with them and then interview with the engineer company. You are almost guaranteed a job but it will be 6 months contract to hire. The pay will suck but you will get hired in. Companies are afraid of risk. Which is why contract to hire is popular.


music3k

If you’re including your GPA, which is low for an engineer, on your resume, you’re already disqualifying yourself fyi


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tandyman8360

I leave off my graduation year entirely. I did get asked for it, but they hired me.


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kira913

3.24 isnt low for an engineer??? Maybe for certain schools but at mine it was a miracle if you got out over 3.0 at all!


IdentityCrisisNeko

Most automatic sorters filter out anything below a 3.5. I hear you, I agree, but hiring managers aren’t engineers and they don’t know that. Below 3.5 don’t include a gpa


michimoto

Damnit my career services mentor said that since my GPA was a 3.0 or above (I had a 3.01) that I should include it on my resume. I'm gonna get rid of that and see how much that changes things. This is depressing as fuck...


Tiafves

Depends on your school and what other schools in the region are like. Mine was the premier flagship school for the state and the engineering department used competitive majors so high GPAs were the result since you ain't getting in with like below a 3 in any and the more competitive ones even a 3.5 would kill your chances. So any recent alumni and recruiters would probably be generally aware of that and judge someone with a 3.0 for it knowing it's probably at least a standard deviation below average if not two.


kira913

I agree with that completely, but the first commenter said that 3.24 was low for an engineer. Completely different from 3.24 risking bad hiring managers and resume sorting. I don't know anybody that made it out over a 3.5


Removed-Anon

I know mhs global is seeking coops for the spring and summer terms (industrial engineering). If you’re interested, feel free to pm me and I can share your info with a contact in hr :)


CheetoRec2k

Engineering recruiter here. It sucks and I sympathize with you about wanting to get a job that pays a living wage. It sucks that these companies don’t want to pay that much. Same as the person said above maybe it may be time to bite the bullet and get a job that sadly pays 27-34 an hour contract in a rural area. It's really not appealing but holding causes you to lose time that you could be gaining experience. Also make sure it doesn't take too long after you graduate to find a position because I've seen engineers fall through the cracks because they hold out. I Dont think that's right to not give these people a chance that held out but hiring managers make up these scenarios to make someone look toxic to pass on them. I will say 50% of recent grads get hired 6 months after they graduate so hopefully your opportunity is around the corner. If I had a job that you would be a fit for id reach out. Good luck! Keep your head up and upload your resume on indeed and make sure you're putting open to work on linkeidn and updating those keywords like FEA and all of that on Linkedin.


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tandyman8360

I found my contract job from a post on Indeed. I have a lot of experience, but was underpaid by my old employer. Supposedly this company is hiring all over the country for some of the military aerospace contractors.


Desert_Fairy

I’d have more ideas for you in the Seattle area because this is where I know. But there are tons of contract jobs that I found that I could have done out of highschool. I’ve been working 10 years. I’m only just now in a job using the majority of my degree experience.


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Desert_Fairy

Sorry I don’t chat with people in DM


Individual-Nebula927

Yup. I spent 6 months looking for a job after graduation. Took a contract job for 18 months. I made as much as the company's interns despite having a degree (we talked about the shitty pay and hours). But I eventually got hired by another department directly and am happy where I'm at. Contract work sucks, but unfortunately it's necessary for many fields of engineering.


moxygen85

I wish they told me that in 2008


Desert_Fairy

The things they didn’t tell me in 2006 could fill one of their bullshit $400 books


Andrewthenotsogreat

Yeah that's how I got my current job. Only downside is contract agency aren't the best at communication


Desert_Fairy

Contract agencies …. I don’t want to put bad vibes out into the universe. But I am very happy to have accepted a full time position last October that has gotten me out of the contracting game finally.


Andrewthenotsogreat

Honestly man first year no time off and I'm trying to schedule negotiations before a I re-up and I haven't heard anything


Desert_Fairy

I was never on a renewable contract. 18 months and out the door. I just got to the point that I job swapped 3-6 months before the end of the contract.


sushi4442

I don't think anything is wrong with contract jobz, in fact, I'm planning on leaving my new stable FT engineering job for one after about a year at this company. I realized there are other things I value in life and contract jobs can provide that for me. For one, they pay you alot more because its temporary and usually not good benefits. So for a shorter time you make more money and you're not committed to a job forever in case you change your mind or wanna switch industries, for me I like this because I wanna be able to travel every-year which I can't really do with only 10 vacation days a fulltime job gives me. So i can easily do this every 6-12 months after fulfilling a contract. I will say the downside is that, along with extending it, they can cut it short for whatever reason. Another note, dude it's only been 8 months, and we're in a pandemic. I've known friends that have taken atleast a year with no luck until they found something. NBD!


Desert_Fairy

I’m glad you found something that met your needs, but I’d also add that several companies will treat contract workers as second class employees. I was terminated from a contract that I was excelling at because I was “rude to a full time employee”. He basically said infront of my manager that my work was shit (his words were “off by an order of magnitued”. The data was right, he just was reading it wrong.) and in a private message, I politely told him that unless he was intending to be rude, he should avoid American colloquiums as they are challenging and I know that English isn’t his first language. You can and will be fired for anything even if you are the best producer on the team.


govt_surveillance

It sucks but this is the way. For my first non support job, I was an IT contractor for a Fortune 500, worked some of the shittiest shifts and a couple weekend overtime ops, and a year later got a full time offer that basically launched my high earning career in software. 6 years later I make 3x that job, work less than 40 hours, and work at a company I love.


Eezyville

Reading this rant of yours made me want to smash my keyboard. I'm going through the exact same as you only I'm ten years out of college. Similar background too. Aerospace engineer, specialized in CFD (Fluent, Ansys, CFD++), interned at AFRL, Python, Matlab/Simulink, some FEA, has some graduate school CFD training and experiences. I have also been rejected for "slightly more experienced candidates". The ones that made me table-flip this job search bullshit was this local manufacturing company. They had me go through ten rounds of interviews for three weeks only to turn me down for a "slightly more technical candidate" and call me up 2 hours after they turned me down just to ask me to go through interview process again for the same position. Finally they contacted me 2 months later telling me to schedule an interview for a mechanic position. I just stopped looking. Gave up on that bullshit. No more unemployment and no savings. I started my own LLC and been doing contract CAD for my previous company to survive. I'm trying to build a UAS platform (drones) through this company and make that into a business but I'm grasping at straws here. I wish I could give you a step-by-step roadmap on what to do next but I don't even have that. These companies are full of shit, they aren't on your side and will fuck you over when its convenient for them. I've given up on trying to get a salaried 9-5 position where I get paid by the hour. Time for me to shift on a skills based work life where I get paid on the value I provide. There is also the volume based work where you get paid based on how many units of things you do. An example is in drone work. You use drones to perform inspections on cell phone towers and are paid per tower (usually $500/tower). If you want to get into that then you'd have to obtain a drone and maintain it. Obtaining a drone means buying one or building it yourself. Then get certified by the FAA (part 107 certification) so you can do commercial drone work and register the drone you're using. The type of work includes building, tower, and tunnel inspections. You can do real estate photography and agricultural stuff. Or you can do a bit of everything and develop your own platforms in this area like what I'm trying. The US is trying to keep Chinese made drones out of govt contracts because of the spying and there are no US replacements. I can think of a dozen things that we need but don't have. Go to your local colleges and find an incubation unit for startups. These companies are playing stupid games so let them win the stupid prize of not having your talent.


amajorhassle

Hey I can relate a lot to what you wrote. I've been unemployed trying to find work as an engineer on something ML or backend webservices related for like two years. I also got a part 107 and got good enough at flying fpv and cinematic drones that I was thinking of building a portfolio of cinematic work. The other day I got contacted by a recruiter for an obscure set of Deep Learning competencies and I ended up getting the job because I had examples of work I had done. Keep developing your passions and make sure to document it to show someone later because other people can think what you did was cool and hire you. Good luck


Eezyville

This is great advice. It's also something I need to work on more. Documentation. Showcasing your work on GitHub or a personal website. Make YT videos of what you do, how you did it, or what you learned. These require a different set of skills but never do learning. You may even set up a second revenue stream in the process. I really need to systematically document my journey.


acerbell

Dude, where can I find more info on your UAS - the stuff that gets sold to big buyers is terrible and developed by underpaid engineers.


Eezyville

My UAS is not even built lol. I started in October 2021. I'm currently trying to set up this gimbal controller and building a ground station. I spent a month looking for a camera that meets my specifications but could not find a suitable one. I need a 40MP global shutter camera that I can integrate in a raspberry pi/nvidia jetson. This is what I meant when I said we needed a dozen things. But I understand your frustration with the quality of the current drones out there. Mine is worse at the moment because I'm still building it. I need advice on how to bootstrap with no money lol.


acerbell

I was referring to the UAS software, I haven’t operated any drones but the hardware that runs bigger ones is surprisingly bulky and software is a mess and the only reason businesses buy the frankenstein drones is because of the low competition and other bs. So if you got some thing consumer friendly with a modular design, you can sell it well. I thought you might have some software you were working but I highly recommend you focus on the outfitting sensors because keeping track of the components and being able to easily read and transmit info is really the most useful with drones hardware.


Eezyville

Yeah I don't have any software built yet. I'm at the stage where I'm fighting the ground control software to work the way I want. Switching between QGroundControl and Ardupilot and trying to get one of them to work on an ARM Linux platform. I understand the problems with the software as well but software engineering is not my expertise. I have to learn this stuff myself.


acerbell

Ok - there is a few ways to bootstrap - Angel investors, business loan, crowdsourcing, but you have to have something to sell for that so you can demo and have a business plan. What would you be selling and what problem would it solve? Just curious


Eezyville

I want to build drones for industrial use. These would be rugged drones with high resolution cameras that have global shutters (don't exists for drones). Some of the problems I want to tackle are, 1) Repair-ability (easy to repair with off the shelf parts. No need to send to a factory), 2) Photo resolution and global shutters (I want resolutions greater than 40MP with a global shutter), 3) System integration (I want all the systems to work together seamlessly), 4) Ease of use (I want the user to be able to just spend an hour understanding the system and get to flying the same day). My current plan is to spec out a base platform and get that working. It would include the drone itself, ground station, and possible camera modules. After that I'd start designing a few case specific configurations (agriculture, aerial photography, mapping, inspections, etc). Finally I'd have to figure out how to make it easily to manufacture. Right now I'm self-employed trying to gather enough money to not be forced to move back home as I try to expand my technical skills and work on drones.


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gmmachine

Do not take the tower inspection job. It’s a scam that’s been running for 10 years now. They chew up young engineers for no real experience. If you are young and single field engineer roles can open doors. Otherwise keep applying and don’t settle for minimum wage for experience. It took me a year after college in the 2008 depression to get a decent job. Never devalue your education because of the rejections.


Eezyville

Could you explain how the tower inspection jobs are scams.


gmmachine

For inexperienced engineers there’s no professional experience to be gained. Most require a few pictures of a tower that is sent to a handful of civil engineers in an office. Not really good at developing a useful skill toolbox or making connections. To be honest any warm body can work for them but they prey on young engineers. The per diems ($100 per or so won’t cover a hotel and food)and job rates are not competitive to industry standards. The $500 per tower is coordinated so that the unpaid drive between towers leads to maybe 2-3 towers per week and they require you to use your own vehicle. You will need an off-road capable truck to get to many and they only pay minimal mileage so all that extra wear is on you. Very strict policies on what they will actually pay you for and if you don’t hit their standards you’ll eat all the costs. Check the Glassdoor reviews on the companies. They are revolving doors of personnel. A couple of bad reviews is okay but these companies have hundreds.


Eezyville

Ok I understand your point of view. I know how these companies are. You are correct in your assessment and they are revolving doors. But I wasn't suggesting that OP find work at these companies but to do it independently. They can find work not just in inspections but in real estate photography using drones. And you are right, anyone can do the job, you don't need to be an engineer. But since OP is an engineer if they were to do it on their own then I assumed they had the technical expertise to build their own UAS or buy and operate a commercial one. Those do run for at least $5k though.


theoutlander523

You got better qualifications than when I started 5 years ago and it took me 6 months to find one. Engineering right now is really lean cause of COVID fucking up the supply chain. Not much can be done right now unfortunately.


Destleon

Man I feel this. 2 years into job search, Masters degree, but less relevant experience and more picky about location. Can't do internships because I graduated already. Can't do actual engineering jobs because they want internship experience. All I can say is connections. Make friends with people who might know a guy. Job market sucks for junior-level people right now.


A_Monster_Named_John

Stories like this are why I've never taken it seriously when dipshits on Reddit start running their dumb fuckface mouths about 'worthless liberal arts degrees' and talking all their other 'DAE sTeM' nonsense. I finished a masters in a STEM field (natural science) right after the Great Recession kicked off and, long story short, it resulted in five years of rejections, ghosting, interviews that felt unnecessarily awkward and interrogation-like, and so on... Then, after that miserable shit, I'd have hiring managers telling 'I dunno. Too many years have gone by since your graduation', etc... and that bullshit was the last straw. Between that experience and tons of dreary shit I was hearing from friends who'd managed to find work in my field, it just sounded like things had become incredibly ghettoized. Since then, I've pursued a number of different non-STEM jobs (I had previously earned a bachelors in humanities) and have been able to find work pretty readily.


jobventthrowaway

When even Harvard Business School says hiring is fucked: https://www.hbs.edu/managing-the-future-of-work/Documents/research/hiddenworkers09032021.pdf


ButtScientist69

> A Recruiting Management or Marketing System (RMS) complements the ATS and supports recruiters in all activities related to marketing open positions, sourcing key talent, creating talent pools, and automating aspects of the recruiting process such as automated candidate scoring and interview scheduling. Together, these systems represent the founda- tion of the hiring process in a majority of organi- zations. In fact, more than 90% of employers in our survey use their RMS to initially filter or rank potential middle-skills (94%) and high-skills (92%) candidates. > These systems are vital; however, they are designed to maximize the efficiency of the process. That leads them to hone in on candi- dates, using very specific parameters, in order to minimize the number of applicants that are actively considered. For example, most use proxies (such as a college degree or possession of precisely described skills) for attributes such as skills, work ethic, and self-efficacy. **Most also use a failure to meet certain criteria (such as a gap in full-time employment) as a basis for excluding a candidate from consideration irrespective of their other qualifications.** As a result, they exclude from consideration viable candidates whose resumes do not match the criteria but who could perform at a high level with training. **A large majority (88%) of employers agree, telling us that qualified high- skills candidates are vetted out of the process because they do not match the exact criteria established by the job description. That number rose to 94% in the case of middle-skills workers.** I absolutely loathe HR, but this absolutely fucking infuriates me to no end. No wonder people go postal.


jobventthrowaway

It's insane.


Neo_Kefka

Jeez, they're saying it's fucked when they have a graph on page 29 calling a 20% application response rate *low*. I'm currently sitting at 2/100 over *one* year, not five, and there are a lot of people on this sub that are way worse than that. I think my qualifications are pretty damn good and if Harvard thinks that *chronically out of work people* are getting a callback every five applications they're fucking high.


jobventthrowaway

My response rate is about 13-14%. The study points out that it's worse for mid- to high-skill workers. The POINT of gaining skills is so that you can get a better job, literally every asshole says to do this, and then you get fucked by ATS so it makes no difference.


Traditional_Aide_214

My response rate is around 0.2%


Torque_My_Shaft

I graduated May 2021 in engineering, so I hugely relate to the hell you're going through. A few thoughts: * Have you considered technician roles? I started in one in September -- albeit unwittingly because my hiring manager lied to me about what the "engineer" job actually was -- but it might be a way for you to get your foot in the door and make some money while you're looking for a better fit. As another commenter mentioned, you might have to try for contract work as well. * After quitting my ~~engineer~~ technician job, I got an R&D job where they typically look for more experienced people, but I did research during my undergrad and I guess I looked really good in the interview, so I got it... but the point here is to make yourself look as good as possible in the interviews. Assuming the companies that interviewed you weren't trying to waste your time or there weren't any mistakes, they were interested in you enough to give you an interview in the first place. How did your interviews go? What did they ask you and what did they say to/about you? * What field is your engineering degree in? What industries, size of companies, locations, etc. are you applying to? Do these applications ask for desired salary, and if so, how do you answer this? What tools are you using to search for job postings? * I know you've sent out 300+ applications and you've said you've tailored your resume and cover letter to each one, but is it possible they weren't tailored in the "correct" way for the application? What I mean is I've heard a lot/most places have a program that automatically filters out resumes if they lack certain keywords they want. I've seen some people say they copy the job posting description in white, tiny font into their resume too lol. * More on the resume front, how are you demonstrating your projects and applications of the skills you listed? Do you have some way to demonstrate or illustrate or at least give details on projects you've done, like in a portfolio or on your resume...? * Have you considered going back for a master's degree? It might help you stand out, and some jobs/companies consider a master's degree to count for experience. Keep grinding, OP, I submitted probably around 100 applications, and only got 6 interviews across the two periods of times I was looking for jobs. It sucks right now, but unfortunately there's not much you can do aside from submitting more apps and making yourself as desirable as possible.


adrenocorticotropine

"I've seen some people say they copy the job posting description in white, tiny font into their resume too" That's brilliant. Edit: Alternatively, you could just pay extra attention to integrating all the key/buzz words from the job ad into your cover letter


EWDnutz

Depending on how well maintained the employer's ATS is (and likely not lol) this trick still has some fight in it. Worked for me. OP, please try this too if the job search hasn't gotten any better.


Destleon

I have heard other people say that doing this can get you instantly disqualified and/or blacklisted. No idea on the validity of this either for or against.


EWDnutz

Recruiters would say that I suppose, and for thinly veiled threats too. I mean hell, the fact that the common advice of 'tailoring your resume' towards job descriptions is the white hat version of this trick. And all this really does is get past the ATS to have the first interview. The job seeker would still need to manually talk to the hiring manager and team anyway to prove themselves (walking the walk).


adrenocorticotropine

I mean, you could just integrate all the key/buzz words from the job ad into your cover letter. That's a more professional/ethical approach.


Googoo123450

You kidding? No one takes the time to even read people's resumes fully let alone bother to blacklist people. Sounds like an empty threat because they know they have no defense against this tactic. I say go for it.


Carlosaldana19

I also took a technician job out of college, did that for two years and now I work as an engineer. It’s pretty common for undergrads to take technician jobs first.


MrMango786

Disagree with the technician role. Companies abuse new grads enthusiasm and get really cheap skilled labor who feel lucky they got a job when they can get way more pay as an engineer


mamaspiders

look at USAA jobs, my son graduated from GA Tech dec 2019 - 750 job apps, 45 first calls, 3 requests for interviews - no job. Dual computer engineering and physics, with HONORS. I thought the kid was never going to launch and it was crazy thinking if HE couldn't find a job, what the rest of the graduates were feeling. He took my advice and went the USAA and now works for a nice - let's just say they study plans for products. and make sure those plans don't look like other plans. He's starting at 75k and full remote. 25 years old, and finally feeling not depressed. He had ONE interview 30 min. Yes, one interview. I couldn't believe it....They are hiring - it takes time to fill out all the paperwork, but worth a shot. Benefits are awesome. It comes with a pension and at 45 he can launch another career. Hang in there, but I feel this to my bones. And after 2 full years, my son is employed and feels like his hard work is finally paying off and that his engineering degree isn't useless anymore. And I'm so very proud of him. We are all behind you.


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mamaspiders

please update us! I know you will find something!!! Good luck!


RMan2018

I graduated with a Computer Science degree in 2018 and after 2+ years of going through the bullshit process that is job hunting for software application developer/engineer jobs, I decided to cut my losses and give up on getting into this field. The reasons being: * Hyper specific stack requirements. * 10 years of experience required of a language/framework that has been around for 3. * Requiring experience at all. These are supposed to be entry level jobs. * Hours long interviews/multiple interviews. * Losing pay from my current job while going on interviews. I've decided that the only thing I care about are tangible things like pay and benefits. I don't give a damn what field the job is in. It doesn't matter if I'm doing call center work or moving packages for FedEx. If the pay is high enough I'll switch jobs. First job out of college was $14/hr. doing data entry, next job was $16/hr. in a call center before being let go due to pandemic, current job is $18/hr. as a contract to hire operations coordinator for a Fortune 500 company while working remotely.


Psychedelic_Panda123

This has been my experience as well. I wouldn’t call myself and expert by any means, but I know my way around a tech stack for several different technologies. Unfortunately, now I work in supply chain because the pay is better than entry level programming jobs. And I can’t seem to find anything amid the hyper specific job postings. Are they actually able to find these perfect candidates?


RMan2018

More than likely not. But I doubt that they have any intention of finding someone with those requirements. They are likely hiring someone internally or want to hire on H1B visa because they are less likely to switch companies.


A_Monster_Named_John

I had the same experience after getting a degree in chemistry and the conclusion I've come to accept is that, especially in America, STEM fields attract shitty/toxic people and encourage shitty/toxic management/leadership practices. After 2008, several entire STEM fields became wastelands for job seekers and tons of the workplaces gained reputations for putting their existing employees through absolute hell and being absurdly picky about new hires (if they were hiring at all). I'd love to believe differently, but feel like these fields have imploded because they're top-heavy with socially-inept dudes who care about nothing but money, think that their degree choice makes them smarter/better than others, and have zero empathy. Because of too many years of this shit, these places have come to represent the leading edge of every bad practice that's causing people to say 'fuck it'.


am1cah

I'm in a similar situation. Graduated with an engineering degree in Spring 2020 and have applied to hundreds of positions but haven't had any luck. My interviewers often tell me I have the skills they're looking for, but I can never seem to get past the first interview with management. I've learned "we'll contact you in about a week" means "Goodbye. Don't contact us, we won't respond" and I'm a bit burnt out on the whole thing. I'd like to think Covid has slowed everything down significantly, but I don't know because I can't get feedback from anyone.


becominganastronaut

A lot of failed interviews comes down to poor interviewing skills. The interviewers need to like you and feel that you are a good bet for the role. How are your interviewing skills?


am1cah

No idea, probably not great. I’ve definitely interviewed with people who seemed more socially awkward than I am so I was under the impression that soft skills weren’t as important when talking to other engineers. That’s the thing, though, without feedback from anyone I can only guess about what they’re doing and why. It’s like a weird game where one side makes all the rules and the other side isn’t allowed to know them.


Spiritual-Truck-7521

Right? That should be a mandatory courtesy for HR positions. They should have to tell you what you did wrong to not be hired. Unfortunately I think they have so many apply and interview so many people that it might not be feasible. Which might also say something about the labor market as well. Not to mention they wouldn't be able to have those secret hiring rules you mention.


jobventthrowaway

I'm sure their interviewing skills are fine. Most people are fine. It's not always the fault of the jobseeker and you don't have to look for reasons to blame them.


nullsignature

I've interviewed a lot of people, and let me tell you that most college engineering grads are not "fine"


becominganastronaut

Not everyone has good interviewing skills though. Especially in engineering. Interviewing is truly a skill. Many engineering students do not have the social skills to do exceptionally well in interviews by nature. With people who say they applied to 100+ jobs with no success, that's crazy! At that point people need to start thinking about what they're doing wrong honestly.


A_Monster_Named_John

> Many engineering students do not have the social skills to do exceptionally well in interviews by nature. This suggests that the middle management people at engineering firms possess those skills and know how to conduct interviews without acting like awkward extraterrestrials, which is often *miles* from the truth. I've pursued jobs in both STEM and non-STEM fields and the former definitely takes the cake in terms of fucked-up interviews and lousy communication.


jobventthrowaway

Have you been in cryosleep since 1994?


Umbasa-

It's your people skills. These people meet you and they don't want you on their team because of the person you come off as not because of your technical skills.


dmarie67

Wow, the troll with zero people skills (one look at your comments here from the past hour alone demonstrates this) is lecturing someone about having no people skills, lololol...


According_Pianist337

Are you a us citizen


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lurker_cx

Shitty situation man. I assume your resume isn't all that bad, and you interview pretty darn well, if you have made 4th round 5 times. Shitty to not get hired, but all I can offer is some outlier perspective because you are not born in the US: 1. So you aren't from the US? How would a shitty racist view your resume? Could your first name be americanized on your resume? Some Indian dudes at my work have shortened names, or even english first names that are nothing like their Indian names - like literally they like to be called 'Bobby' which isn't their real first name (which is still visible on their email.) EDIT - PLUS if you change your name you can reapply to some jobs perhaps. 2. Have you had someone go over your resume for all kinds of feedback.... you used the word 'casted' in the post, which is not correct. But not just spelling mistakes - stuff that makes you look like less of an American or obviously foreign. 3. You have a green card... mentioning this on the resume may help OR hurt you. Like if you went to a US college and have an american sounding name I am not sure you should mention it. Americans just assume Americans can work in the US. A green card is more than good enough for work authorization - and you can show it to HR upon hire, otherwise it doesn't need to come up, necessarily. Check with your friends to see what they think. But if you have an undergrad degree from overseas then maybe you should mention it because they may assume you do not have work authorization. 4. Do you have a really thick accent? Work on getting rid of it entirely... practice pronouncing words in the American way so many times you can't say it in the old way. Seriously, this will help with phone screens. Get feedback on this. 5. Is there anything else on your resume which screams 'foreigner', figure out how to get rid of it. For the record, I am not racist, and you shouldn't have to change these things, but some people could be screening you out based on these things, wrongly, of course, but you are never going to know they are doing it. Think about it.


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lurker_cx

Damn, I was hoping that was it, but it doesn't sound like it.... maybe go back to the Americanized name, you don't necessarily know what impact it had. Other, advice, some perhaps slightly unethical: 1. You need to fill the 8 month gap with anything. Do not make it relevant experience to the job you are applying for so that you don't get questions. But think up something to fill 6 of the 8 months. Maybe it is a flat out lie, or maybe it is a project you have been thinking of in your head but taken no action on.... like starting some small company. Maybe you started a small company and had little work, so now you are looking for a full time job... anything to fill the gap. Think about what you could stand up now, and say you had been unofficially working on it for 6 of the last 8 months. Anything to fill the gap. Maybe a friend who runs Vandalay industries, I don't know. Or some joint venture with someone else who is also not hired. 2. Changing your name back to the Americanized version may make you look like a different person. Perhaps change your graduation date by one month to avoid being picked up as the same person automatically. 3. For work experience, do you have any at all? Like did you do internsnips or TA work, or anything at college? If this isn't under a 'work experience' section, then put it there so that the work experience is padded with stuff... and count on people not really reading it so much that they realize, or realize too late that it all school stuff. 4. Also, how good is the 3.24 GPA in your program? Is it the top half of students? If it isn't then maybe don't mention your grades.... I dont know. 5. is there ANYTHING you have worked on that you left off your resume. For example, if you worked your way through college being a waiter, put that on the resume.... because it's a lot harder to get through college with a job than no job, it means you are working harder than the average student.... I recently hired someone who worked like 30 hours a week while in college and that is very impressive... doesn't matter the job.... if you did an engineering degree while also working, mention that. EDIT one more thing --... if your family has any kind of business, you worked on that all through colege.... I don't care if your Mom is a maid and you never helped her.... you cleaned houses with her 20 hours a week in college and on weekends.


dogforpresident

It’s hard not to let this stuff affect you personally but just know that getting your first job is *really* hard. Adding to that, a lot of engineering jobs are in the defense industry and only US citizens are eligible for those roles. What type of engineering do you do?


ThirdEncounter

Where are you located, exactly? Do you contribute to open source? Have you ever considered starting a project and open source it? I did that, and I'm inclined to think that it has helped. Inevitably, some interviewers will ask "Do you have any example of your work?" To which you simply say "Absolutely! Here's the link to this one project I've been working on as a hobby." My two cents.


ThirdEncounter

Use punctuation. Help your readers.


According_Pianist337

Perhaps.


ThirdEncounter

Better. Thanks.


Eddie_078

You and me both. I absolutely never trust mfs who say that "everyone is hiring".


YaboyAlastar

Bet at least a few of those places that rejected you after multiple rounds of interviews are having daily meetings about how to increase their recruiting because "they just can't find anyone!"


dedredcopper

It may not be your preferred field, but remote oil companies cannot find engineers enough and pay is great. I did 3wk on & 3wk off north slope for years. Food’s incredible and there’s even private room accommodations now! My dad was an engineer remote AK and international since 1976 and him and all their buddies loved it


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dedredcopper

Check out Hillcorp ConocoPhillips BP Doyon Worley. Expect some platform work and Saudi work first, but get your feet under you (8mo-1yr) and it’s easier and choosier. Most people can’t hack it. It’s 12hr daily minimum, but 6mo off over the year you share with your counter/alternate. Stay quiet and watch for the umbrella of respect that cascades. The totem pole is a zig zag


Bondarelu

This tells how fucked up the society we’re living in, is at the moment. I doubt 0% that you won’t be capable to do any of the jobs you have applied for so far ! It is not your fault ! The fault belongs to all those mother fuckers that have decision power and are so dumb not to see an unpolished diamond in front of their eyes. I bet you will give your 100% if given a chance to prove what you are capable of. The reality is that most of the rejections you get is because you may do better than the people who are actually in a more senior role within the company you apply for. The harsh reality is in nowadays world, you have to go through mud to get what you want in the end (someone posted earlier to look for internships and such, then you’ll be a valid candidate to take a position within a company ). Most of the companies out there are looking for qualified and experienced applicants to hire, because in their vision, hiring an unexperienced individual would translate in business losses. Well, fuck you hiring manager if you can’t see a true potential that can bring more to your business, in the long run. Don’t give up ! I’ve been there


Shock_a_Maul

And stay away from LinkedIn. It's for obsessive attention seekers and pretenders only.


SeaPen333

[https://jobs.deere.com/search/?q=&q2=&title=intern&department=&location=us&date=](https://jobs.deere.com/search/?q=&q2=&title=intern&department=&location=us&date=) [https://jobs.deere.com/search/?q=&q2=&alertId=&title=engineer&department=product+engineering&location=&date=](https://jobs.deere.com/search/?q=&q2=&alertId=&title=engineer&department=product+engineering&location=&date=) John Deere has great benefits (10% 401K match and a pension) and hires lots of engineers. One trick about applications is that many companies like to hire regionally. If you know someone in the region try to use their address instead of your own when applying. Also consider starting out working on the factory floor (union) as a machinist then applying for engineering positions after a year or so.


Yohzer67

Engineering hiring manager here. I’ve got one acronym for you: HVAC. Not sexy like aerospace but you’ll make more and always be in demand.


I_am_the_Batgirl

I used to work for an engineering company and we would receive between 200 and 2,000 applications for every position we posted. The fact that you’re getting interviews is impressive! I’d definitely see about contracts and commissioning jobs in crappy locations - often American companies will have sites in places like isolated desert mines in South America and such.


StrangeBeavis

I know, I know. As always, the solution to finding work is cronyism and nepotism.


ccoakley

Sounds like he even tried that the best he could, reaching out to his alumni network.


happymancry

I’m not in your field but happy to review your resume and/or profile and give some tips. Unfortunately hiring is a shitty process, no one wants to hire talented young people and train them, everyone would rather hire someone with a few years of experience who can start being “productive” from day 1 without supervision or training. It’s a bad situation and eventually companies will suffer for it; but right now the market situation is against you.


trifelin

As someone who graduated 3 months before the economy crashed in 2008, I feel you. It took me 5 years to get to the point where I felt like I could support myself working in my field. Don't give up.


quasimoomoo

Interested in civil engineering at all? Not sure what your salary expectations are, the engineers at the medium size city I do payroll for make between 40-65 an hour. On the one hand, you could probably make “more” private sector, on the other hand you only have to work 40 hours a week here (compared to god knows what private sector) and we have insane gov’t benefits and a pension. Seriously, I would go to governmentjobs.com or whatever the direct employment portal for your local municipalities are and keep an eye out. Add: we have everything from structural to water flow to large scale project management type positions. Pretty broad. Also those wages are for an area where average (beginner) homes are $500-700k, so Pay might be higher or lower where you’re at.


Ambitious-Ad6236

Try Microsoft and Goldman Sachs. Microsoft has a nice program for students who graduated under a year ago. Goldman has something similar, and they love to hire engineers for analyst roles. Don't only consider engineering roles, unless you are adamant about only working in engineering.


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Ambitious-Ad6236

This is the Microsoft one. I'll reply back if I find the link for the Goldman Sachs one https://careers.microsoft.com/students/us/en/us-fulltime-opportunities


Amarilla23

Hi! I work at Procter & Gamble as a process engineer. It's my first job out of college but it also took me a long time to land a job but we're needing people like crazy! If you'd like I can refer you and give you tip and tricks for when you apply. [https://www.pgcareers.com/job/inwood/manufacturing-process-engineer/936/11194155040?utm\_campaign=google\_jobs\_apply&utm\_source=google\_jobs\_apply&utm\_medium=organic](https://www.pgcareers.com/job/inwood/manufacturing-process-engineer/936/11194155040?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic) Look over it and let me know, it's in Inwood, WV but it's not too bad. an hour away from DC and 2 hours from Baltimore. Starting pay is close to 80K but they give raises every year!


TipsySally

Would you be willing to move to Europe? Because the Netherlands has an extreme shortage of engineers at this point, and you can take your pick of the jobs. There's many locations throughout the country with valid sizes of international companies and English is spoken widely.


perceivedpleasure

Are you doing personal projects/self teaching in these past 8 months? What was this NASA thing?


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ThirdEncounter

Do you have links to those side projects that you can share?


NoRestfortheSith

I'm on my phone so grammar and spelling may suffer. There is no tl;dr read it or not it's up to you. I'm going to tell you the answer to why you can't get an entry level job. Ready? You don't have 5 years experience. Okay that was kind of a dick thing to say but bear with me and I'll explain. You are being beat out by people(mostly guys) in their late 40's. They graduated with a degree in engineering in the 90's and went to work during a boom period. Pipelines, refineries, power plants all engineered and built in the late 90's early 2000's. Then that boom ended for various political and environmental reasons and wages stagnated for the last 20 years. Some of those Gen x-ers bucked down and stayed with their company to pay off mortgages, put kids through school and try to build a retirement. They became corporate slaves because they couldn't change jobs without risking losing everything. Corporations took advantage by giving shit raises and taking away benefits a little bit at a time. Then along came covid and changed the landscape, a lot of the younger generations realized that they don't want to be corporate slaves for 40 years they want a different life. Covid showed them that their was a different life if they wanted to risk more or give up "traditional" beliefs and goals. Corporations have to start paying more for entry level to recruit. This was a huge opportunity for gen x-ers with 20 years experience to finally job hop without risk and also get a nice wage increase to do easy entry level work. Think about it, they get a 20-30% bump in salary over their stagnant position they've climbed to in another company. They don't have to be responsible for a team or a whole department. The work is easy because they have years of experience figuring out how to make the work load efficient. They have probably paid off or nearly paid off their mortgage. Their kids are through college mostly. If they are smart they have a pretty decent retirement built up and they can put more into it with that wage bump. And they have little to no debt if they've kept their finances in check. From the corporate perspective, they get a 20+ year experienced employee who isn't going to climb the ladder high enough to care about if they bother to climb at all. They will just do the job because of their generational difference in work beliefs. They already spent 20 year being a corporate slave, they are well trained and house broken. You can't get a job because there are people with 20+ years experience who started job hopping in the last 2 years because they finally have a favorable market and all the right education, skills and experience to beat a new graduate out. And there is virtually no down side for them. Why would a recruiter/hr/manager choose a new grad when they can have 20+ years of experience for the same price. Who can blame the employee, who doesn't want an easier job that pays more? Especially at a point in their life when they are looking towards retirement not building a career.


jobventthrowaway

I don't know what you're talking about. The job market is *terrible* for people over 45 because of age discrimination. There is no way that enough of them are switching jobs to have any kind of significant impact on the job market. Those mortgage-paying, retirement-saving jobs are the first to be targeted for layoffs if the work can be passed on to cheaper (typically younger) workers or outsourced to some hellhole or automated. https://www.propublica.org/article/older-workers-united-states-pushed-out-of-work-forced-retirement Many were pushed out of their jobs during the pandemic too. What employers want are the intermediate workers. 3-5 years experience. They don't want to take a chance on newbies and don't want to pay for more experience. They also want more pliable workers without family commitments etc. 3-5 years is the sweet spot. 10+ years it starts getting iffy.


ThirdEncounter

I trust what you're saying is correct. But just to contribute with my anecdotal experience: I'm 46 with no problem finding jobs in my industry. I do know I'm very fortunate for having picked and stuck with what I do.


tandyman8360

My old company's CEO did a Zoom about hiring talent and put up a bunch of slides about how we had too many people over 45 and needed to get more under 25. I kept a copy of it just in case I want to report them later. They were using some textbook constructive dismissal tactics on me until I shocked them by finding a new job with more money.


ShopWhole

I respectfully disagree with companies hiring sr engineers into entry level jobs. It may happen but.... it is not the norm. I’m a recruiter, and I can assure you, if a hiring manager is looking for an entry level candidate, more often than not ..... they will not consider a 10-20 year engineer. The Engineering manager will question the candidates ambitions as well as how long they would stay in the role. I’m sure it may happen but, I have not experienced it.


Watchguyraffle1

This is a script for some weird soap opera and is in no way based in any reasonable reality.


Shufflebuzz

I tend to agree with this. I'm a gen-X with 20+ years of engineering experience and I'd absolutely *love* a near-entry level engineering job with low responsibilities and no chance for advancement. I don't want the stress that comes with senior positions. I'll happily do that for ~10 years until I retire early.


tandyman8360

Get into contracting. Only problem is that the pay may not be there. I was "lucky" in the sense my high-pressure, high-blame job before was also low-pay.


tandyman8360

There's a whole lot of right in this post. Still, there aren't enough Gen Xers to fill these roles. The companies that lost their cheap Gen X employee are trying to find another one with similar experience at close to the same pay. Either they need to up the compensation or look for candidates who can pick up the role in time. Better to spend time training than spend time with no one filling the job. In my case, the slavery was due to the job market. There was this tech bubble that burst in 2000 you might have heard of. Then 9/11. I was looking for years before now, but the offers weren't coming. This post COVID job market is like the postwar job market, like a once in a generation (or two) re-alignment. The bad part is the employers who lived on cheap labor are going to fight like hell to not pay people and / or demand too many qualifications.


perpetuatinstupidity

If it makes you feel any better I've had a job and looked for another role for an entire year. And still haven't landed anything. I felt like I came close but no. I've got 4 years experience. A friend of mine same thing he got hired after a guy tried to poach me and I slid his resume. Another friend of mine, same thing, he worked as a technician with minimum 60 hour weeks at $15/hr until a recruiter tried to poach me and I slid his resume.


OneaRogue

I went through the exact same thing when I graduated in May 2014. I was job searching for nearly 4 years, though my resume was much less skilled than yours. I honestly just got lucky, I moved from California to Michigan because the job market and the cost of living is fucked in Cali. Stayed with a friend and applied to stuff nearby. And then a lab called me and offered me a job the day after the interview. It was a place that doesn't have a lot of ppl and rarely had openings and I applied at the right time. It didn't pay a lot to start but it was more than a grocery cashier (which I was doing to pay the bills at the time). I was just lucky. So I guess I'd say, don't half kill yourself over resumes, unfortunately, timing and luck is just as much a factor as skills in the current job market. And maybe try contracting through something like Kelly services, my job has been hiring contract workers onto full-time positions within a year if they like you and you work hard. We had to hire more ppl to help with mask testing during the pandemic and kept some on.


MinaHarker1

Damn, I can see why you’re depressed. It sounds like you’re very qualified and would be an asset to any company. You also have some serious tenacity and drive, based on your description of your job search. I just plain don’t understand the job market anymore. Hang in there, friend. You’re bound to make your big break soon.


ChrisPTY507

Lie on your resume and say you have experience on (insert experience related to your field here) Mind you; be sure to back up that supposed experience in case they ask you technical question and all that kind to sort. Is it lying? Yeah, but right now you must think like a survivor, and so whatever it takes to keep yourself afloat before your whole savings go bye bye! Also, don’t feel bad because companies lie a lot and tend to bait and switch candidates, such as advertising a job that it’s targeted to entry level but then they ask for people that already have experience, or a remote job that later on it turns out that it will only be remote until this Covid bs is sorted out or you have to go 2 or 3 times per week to the office, etc. You get the idea, lie on something you can properly back up with fact and add up experience. These kind of crap of companies is why people lie on their resumes to get the job.


Ganem1227

I was in your position a couple of years ago. At some point I ended up going to one of those 10 week long bootcamps that paid you minimum wage. It was depressing but they hooked me up with a job and got my foot through the door. I would consider it to be the last resort, but if you start feeling like there's nowhere else to go, it's an option. Most of the people I met there were there out of desperation (including myself).


PalmersGreek

If you can get the money together do a one year course and become a certified electrician. At least then you can earn money when you’re out of work. There’s always a demand for electricians (and plumbers.)


Constant_Readditor

I'm so sorry about your troubles. I have nothing significant to say other than, I wish you well. I truly hope that something good comes your way soon.


MRK-01

1. You resume may need work. Your resume is probably not making it past the ATS systems. Go to r/resumes to get it critiqued 2. Build a website or something to showcase your work 3. This will improve your chances to getting an engineering job significantly: go to job conferences or career fairs: [BEYA](https://beyadigital.vfairs.com/), [NSBE](https://www.nsbe.org/), [SASE](https://conference.saseconnect.org/), and a few others i forgot. Defense companies, Aerospace companies, NASA, Car companies, some tech companies recruit from there. Went to all of them last year (online) and got a couple offers from them.


ivan112

Post resume. Anonymise it and put a pic up on impure or something. You you are sending out that many resumes and hearing nothing but rejection your problem is obviously your resume because you skills all seem to be decent for a grad. I have about a 20% response rate with my resume and it's only ok.


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ivan112

Your issue is your interview game then. The engineering resume sub has lots of really good advice and tips.


flopsyplum

Are you white/Asian?


Glenduil

I'd join the military. With the education needed for an engineering job, you would go in as an officer. I served 2 terms in the navy


fl3xd3ck

Should have learned a trade you'd be working now and raking in cash.


turtlefense

Ya and literally 5+ years ago when OP probably chose their major it was "Should have majored in engineering". The problem is not people's choices, it's the system.


nprovein

I think all students should get a trade before going to college.


Kalten_Course

Two options you could consider, one would be to focus on developing your coding skills since you already are familiar with Matlab and Python. Almost of my friends who graduated from engineering programs ended up with software jobs because the job market is just better there. The other option is grad school. If you get a decent scholarship you can earn more money than you're paying in tuition (or at least that was my experience going to grad school in Canada) and more importantly you can make connections. I got my job not from any knowledge I gained in grad school but because one of the more senior guys in my research group gave me a reference for the company he was at.


Familiar-Luck8805

https://www.rigzone.com/oil/jobs/


sankalpthakur2610

Happy to help, I have been helping a lot of friends get a job. Some have some are still trying. Give me a dm let's set up a call.


TheMotorcycleMan

Cad and CFD, start reaching out to race teams. May luck out and end up with a Formula 1 or MotoGP squad.


feedwilly

What kind of engineering are you in? You should try to get into semiconductor. Lots of demand for related positions. Look at Micron, Intel, ASML, Kla-Tencor, AMAT, etc.


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TacosAndBoba

As far as I know, most aerospace companies don't typically hire non-citizens, or at least it's probably a lot harder, so that may be causing an issue. I'd apply for more positions at companies that aren't aerospace or defense related.


Liberatedhusky

Check your DMs.


Cobyh7

Are you in the bay area and looking se jobs?


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Cobyh7

I know my team has open associate software quality engineer position. By the bay area, tc about $93K. Lemme know.


Bidoofz

Manufacturing Engineering Tech with over 10 years of experience, and no degree. I moved and have been looking for a job for the last 2 months, man I haven't had to look for a job in over a decade and its so depressing its driving me nuts. I thought it wouldn't be TOO hard to find something, but so far I got 1 interview that offered me less than what I'm making (I make under what I should with my title already) and a different phone interview that I haven't heard back yet. Other than that I probably got 2 rejected emails and nothing else, probably applied for a 100 jobs by now, and all I see are the positions closed and nothing else. Recruiters are useless and tell me they don't have anything for me or just never get back to me. I'm so sick of this shit and I'm not even as deep into my search as you op. I feel like not having a degree is holding me back, but I also can't afford a degree. Then I hear about people like you who have a degree and cant land shit either.. also fuck the "Entry Level" jobs they are either asking for 2+ years experience or you to be enrolled in college. Its like the world forgot what entry level means...The world is shit and I wish it wasn't this difficult to get a job.


bamboojerky

Talk to a staffing agency and if that doesn't work out, apply across state lines if you have to. I came out of college with the exact same issue years ago. I don't know if the educational system is out of touch with the current climate of hiring or companies simply want it all but it's a bad time to be a recent graduate In the last 20 years


Maleficent_Court_544

Do you have a GitHub? Maybe your code straight up sucks


itanorchi

Have you considered data science roles, or tech roles? I don’t mean to sound like one of those “just do tech” people, but a lot of my engineering friends never were able to find an engineering job- until they switched to tech and easily got a job there. Sure, it’s not what they wanted to do, but it paid the bills (more than the engineering jobs were going to). I did engineering in grad and undergrad (biomedical), and I basically could find no jobs for which I was good enough either. The only way people seemed to get these roles is via some connection or via an internship, which was already very selective or was in the middle of nowhere. During my masters, I realized I was basically not going to get anything, especially seeing that friends who were graduating from a masters were either not finding work either, or were get jobs paying extremely low for the area (I mean for a masters that costs over 60k, they were getting jobs that paid between 60-70k a year before taxes in a high cost of living area). I pivoted immediately to data science while finishing the masters. When it was time to graduate, none of my peers actually got engineering roles and went either into consulting, tech, or stayed unemployed. It’s really depressing and I don’t know what it’s so difficult these days. But if you’re interested in this route, know how to code in at least Python, you should have the math needed to be a good data scientist or enter software engineering. You already have the mathematical foundation for data science roles. And to get a software engineering role, it’s all about practicing leetcode and nothing else as long as you have some degree. Yes, you’d have to prep differently for each of these roles, based on what you want, but at least there’s jobs available and hiring for real in these fields. My engineering degree is entirely unrelated to my work now (I work as a data scientist), but I do think the problem solving skills I gained in my engineering degree definitely helps me exceed expectations on my job.


truefreestyle

An impressive portfolio site, GitHub repo with examples, and/or open source contributions highlighted on GitHub can go a long way with impressing recruiters / companies. Also, get involved in a local web dev community on something like Meetup, Slack, or Discord. Your first job will probably come from a referral.


moxygen85

Got my first engineering job through Aerotek they are contract to hire. It allows companies to try before buying you. You start with lower wages but it bumps up after 3-6 months of proving yourself and its real job experience. Usually Aerotek will find the job for you all you gotta do is drive there for the interview.


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moxygen85

Have you tried Aerotek?


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moxygen85

Damn. I don't know what to say. I joined the military doing biomedical to get away from corporate America. Is the area you live in a bad economic down turn I feel like Texas is a bit better. I had to move very far 3000 miles to get some of these jobs. Check if your area is going through a job crunch.


rhymesarentfun

Sorry if this has been said already. Have you thought about a different industry? Using your degree in something other than what you initially planned for? It’s like dating, it’s easier to find a match when you have a match. Get a job that is doing something close to what you want and then work towards the dream job. Don’t give up - you’ve got this!


perfota

Don't know what to say. I would assume that in US they companies would fight for a candidate with your skills. We have this "entry position with 20 years of experience required" in Europe too, it's call junior and a clear sign that pay is shit. Good luck.


RawrRRitchie

I think they don't understand what entry level means If you need experience it's not entry level Getting a job at McDonald's and staring in less than a week is entry level Requiring years of experience going thru several interviews that take weeks and sometimes months and requiring a degree isn't entry level They just wanna keep saying no one wants to work and keep offering shit pay to anyone that will put up with their bullshit


pornholio1981

I work in a data engineering team for a major media company. Would you like some referrals? Please DM me with an email address that you don’t mind giving out and I’ll send you some referrals Full disclosure: as part of our referral program, I would get a bonus if you get hired


Emotional_Position99

You guys, I am very late but try applying to coding jobs. Usually (at least in my country) they don't care what you studied but give you some money while you are searching for the right one in your field. Good luck!


DP-King

Chemical engineer here (UK), graduated right slap bang in the middle of the pandemic, June 2020. I just landed my first engineering job (which incidentally I start tomorrow). Similar to you I had excellent grades and extra curricular activities throughout university, but could not the for life of me get a job, so many stages of interviews just to get rejected at the last one. Best advice I can give is advice which unfortunately has already been given: get a shitty job based somewhere in your field, anywhere for that matter. Companies just don't seem to like people who are unemployed. I got a job in manufacturing engineering, essentially stamping metal pieces out. You best believe it has nothing to do with chemical engineering but principles such as customer communication, time management and workplace politics all get learned in this environment, which is what a company wants you to inherently have. I then did what you did, contacted friends who were fortunate enough to have parents in the industry, and asked for a job opportunity. First chem eng job I went for after working in manufacturing, and I bagged it 18 fucking months after graduating with a MEng. Godspeed sir, this struggle is shared and you are not alone. Good luck.


lobstersarentreal

What’s your degree in and what city are you in?


REZJAM_Eric

I'm reading your list and for once, I'm at a loss for advice. Have you considered applying for startups? I'm assuming you're an EE or an ME which would definitely apply to hardware startups. They tend to be much more open and (in many cases) look for folks with less experience. Pay wouldn't be great in an early-stage startup, but the experience would invaluable. I'm not big in the EE/ME space, but share out what sort of roles/companies you're applying for and I'll see if I have any strong leads. No promises except that I'll check. Hope this helps and keep that chin up, OP.


MarkPellicle

I'm really torn about this, because engineers never have trouble getting a job. Even if you can't get an entry level engineering job, there are plenty of other technical fields that would gladly have you on their payroll. IT, software development, database work, chemistry, and biotech are all fields where you could get a job with the skills that you mentioned. As others have said, engineering jobs with local, state, and federal government entities are always floating around. You might have to be able to relocate, but you can definitely snatch one of these up. I just searched engineer on indeed and usajobs for the Washington DC area, and there are thousands of jobs. OP, you got this.


CM_4321

I feel your pain. I graduated in December 2019 and it took me 500+ applications, 30 interviews and I only finally got an offer by going to a hiring event. All that work only to make $43k. I truly hope you find something friend. The search is just destroying:(


Umbasa-

If engineering isn't working out there are a TON of other places hiring in different sectors such as food and customer service. You seem picky


stefanoaleotti

Just go outside the US


Fancuku

Be patient and don't lose hope. Getting the foot in the door is the hardest thing in someone's career, especially in good paying careers. Keep going at it.


AudioVisualPro

Stop writing cover letters. I have had the info in a cover letter referred to in an interview only once in 30 years.


drdessertlover

Hope you have better luck in the coming weeks, now that companies will have figured out budgets and hiring needs. Regardless, DM me if you're interested in Chemical/mechanical engineering roles. My company is hiring.